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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but it also raises questions about the way that big business wields its power in washington. how they wield their power and what they are capable of getting for themselves when they want something. i raise that question today in one specific context. we are at the moment when not just newly-elected senators, but incumbents are looking to get their assignments and what kind of work they are able to get done as senators. after the basic question of whether or not you can get elected, your assignment once you're in the senate is the most important thing about a senator's power in terms of what kind of impact you can have in d.c. if you want to influence policy in the senate, step one is get elected. step two is get on the right committees, and step three is try to take over your favorite committee. try to become the chair. both parties have their specific rules on how the assignments are made. the republicans have a term limit rule for being chairman or the top ranking republican on a committee. after six years, you have to roll over. you have to move on to a new place unless you can get a spe
done, what happened in washington today was a study in contrast from that. >> the president, himself, has intentionally misinformed, read that, lied, to the american people in the aftermath of this tragedy. this is not simply a cover-up of a third rate burglary. we have four of our diplomatic personnel dead. >> this administration continues to put out things that are just not quite true. >> if you want to know who is responsible in this town, buy yourself a mirror. our evil doing american citizen hating administration requested a lot more money than we provided. a quarter of a billion dollars in security upgrades that you refuse to make in this committee. and then you have the audacity to come here and say, why wasn't the protection of these people provided for? and the answer is, because you didn't provide it. >> the election was over. the president won re-election. the voices of the public were heard. they want us to cooperate. if you want an honest investigation of this tragedy, we will join you. but if you want to persist in trying somehow to put this, lay this at the doorstep of
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
in washington state. there's san diego. there's tampa, florida in the st. petersburg area. there's baltimore, maryland. there's the virginia beach area, that metro area including norfolk. there is jacksonville, florida. and, of course, there is new orleans. so pop quiz. what do all of these large american cities have in common? you can cheat by looking at this map. what do all of these large american population centers have in common? the answer is that all of these major american cities are right on the edge of america. right on the coastal edge, up next to the sea. now, you could also add even some more major cities to this list if you wanted to. places like philadelphia or washington, d.c. or houston or providence, rhode island. those are all sort of coastal cities, too, in the sense that they are near the coast and they're on waterways. just for the sake of argument, let's not even include those. let's just be narrowly focused here, talking narrowly about big populous metropolitan areas that are right up against the sea. if you add up the population of these cities on america's coastal e
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)